Tag Archive | light fixture

Let There Be Light!

A recent one-act dramedy, taking place in the living room.

Setting: Me, standing on a ladder wielding the drill and trying to put a large hole in the plaster ceiling.

In walks Stuart, looks up at me, face twisting into a grimace.

Stuart: “Usually when I walk in and witness you holding the drill and crying, it means a project for me.”

Me: “Don’t worry, Stuart. I was merely whimpering.”

Stuart walks away and tries not to feel needed. Me, now cursing whoever invented plaster and this old house, tries to continue making a hole in the ceiling, ignoring the arm pain that is caused by holding a drill over your head for way too long. Then I am struck by a bright idea. Perhaps this is my opportunity to show Stuart how much I need him! Besides, every now and then a guy needs to be needed, right?

Stuart to the rescue!

Stuart to the rescue!

Scene 2: Me, now drinking a beer with feet up on the ottoman, watching Stuart put up my light. What is better than that? And we all lived happily ever after, or close enough.

Let There Be Light!

Let There Be Light!

The light was needed in this living room, not only for light, but for visual PAZAM!  It was my birthday present from my mom, who will buy me whatever I ask for without any thought to how it will be installed. A no questions asked sort of confidence policy. She would not want to damage my self-esteem or anything. When Stuart entered the scene above, I had already faced some turmoil with this light. I broke the inside shade that was supposed to conceal the lightbulb. The baby was “helping” me and I was frustrated with the plaster ceiling. The directions went something like: “open box, install light.”

Light fixture, in the store.

Love at first sight… in the store.

The baby "helping" me.

The baby “helping” me, holding the raceway.

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Even with the exposed lightbulb, it looks nice and I had no idea how complicated that raceway stuff is to use. If you want to conceal a wire running across your ceiling, it is great. Here is a tip: Put the wire into the raceway, clip it closed, and only THEN do you stick it to the ceiling. After it is up, it will fade away and not be too noticeable, I promise.

Raceway, used for concealing electrical wires.

Raceway, used for concealing electrical wires.

Installing raceway.

Installing raceway.

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And of course, one thing leads to another…. Now I need to get curtains to conceal the wire running along the window to the plug, which also needs to be replaced.

Living Room Light.

Living Room Light.

It is at these times that I am so grateful for Stuart and I can’t believe he puts up with me.

© copyright 2013 Mariam d’Eustachio.

Midnight Dumpster Dive

Last night I went dumpster diving with the President Emeritus of the Diamond Hill Historical Society. Inspired by a fabulous day at the Community Market, I ended up peering into the dumpster outside of my neighbor’s house, at midnight, all because of a light fixture.

What better way to end an evening of good company, wine, and catching up, than with a well-worn piece of reclaimed wood from the dumpster? I love Lynchburg.

The Community Market is a place to gather, run into your friends, shop for locally grown food, and to feast on a croissant from the best… bakery… ever.

With a full stomach, high spirits, and coffee, we walk around seeking inspiration. It comes easily in this place.

Nearby, we shop in the quaint antique stores. We are filled with the excitement that comes when you are on the prowl for treasure; but leave with only ideas swimming around in our heads and a mission: a mission to find a piece of reclaimed wood. Wood that we can use to recreate the light fixture we want, minus the $450 price tag. This is how we ended up in the dumpster at midnight, hauling out old boards full of nails.

Community markets and farmers’ markets are springing up all over the country as a way to support local, American-grown or American-made goods. This is becoming a way of life and not only leads to good food, great ideas, affordable art, but a healthy economy as well.

© copyright 2012 Mariam d’Eustachio